Volume of Sound Much Lower After Rip

MKV playback, recompression, remuxing, codec packs, players, howtos, etc.
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bbacle
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2018 3:28 pm

Volume of Sound Much Lower After Rip

Post by bbacle » Mon Feb 12, 2018 3:31 pm

Why is the sound much lower than the DVD after the ripping?
Some of the sound I can barely hear even after upping my volume on my computer to the max.
Can you not add a sound volume controller in the program?

Woodstock
Posts: 5260
Joined: Sun Jul 24, 2011 11:21 pm

Re: Volume of Sound Much Lower After Rip

Post by Woodstock » Mon Feb 12, 2018 3:52 pm

Unless you're using one of the audio conversions to generate FLAC audio, what was on the disk is what is copied in the MKV file.

I have not noticed a difference in audio levels when playing DVDs in VLC vs. MKV files made from those DVDs. I have noticed a difference in volume between AAC and AC3 tracks on the same disk, though.
How to aid in finding the answer to your problem: https://www.makemkv.com/faq/item/8

bbacle
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2018 3:28 pm

Re: Volume of Sound Much Lower After Rip

Post by bbacle » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:36 pm

I have used Handbrake and Winx DVD Ripper and the volume is much higher than with the MakeMKV program.
I was using MakeMKV to rip an introductory video for our church announcement time, and we had to turn the volume way up on the soundboard and on the computer to hear it properly.
But when I used the other programs I mentioned earlier, we did not have to turn the volume way up.
So, yes, there is a definite difference in the volume of the sound using MakeMKV versers other programs.
BTW...we use JetAudio to play our videos in the church.

Woodstock
Posts: 5260
Joined: Sun Jul 24, 2011 11:21 pm

Re: Volume of Sound Much Lower After Rip

Post by Woodstock » Mon Feb 12, 2018 10:56 pm

Both the mentioned programs process the audio; you're not getting the original track. In the case of handbrake, the DEFAULT is to convert all audio to AAC. You can tell it to also copy the original AC3 track, and run A/B comparisons between them with playback devices/software that supports multiple audio channels.

It is quite possible you have the same situation I have - my TV doesn't like AAC audio (it sends it out to the amplifier), while AC3 audio (found on most DVDs) plays through the TV speakers directly. Some audio types go through the TV to the amplifier, so there are multiple volume controls influencing what you hear.

Again, MakeMKV is copying the track off the DVD or BD, directly into the MKV file. Unless you're using an advanced profile to convert to FLAC audio, it's the original track. If you play the DVD in VLC, then play the MKV file in VLC, the audio levels should be the same.
How to aid in finding the answer to your problem: https://www.makemkv.com/faq/item/8

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